Wright Y-DNA Blog: Notes and Thoughts

Date:Notes:
14 Dec 2016 New Co-Administrator & Participant Count:

As you probably are aware by now, Zak Jones has offered his help as co-administrator for our Wright-DNA project. He comes with many years of experience running a much larger project, the Jones DNA project. Please welcome Zak!

Currently we have 580 Y-DNA participants in our result tables. These are divided into two pages: Page1) R1b1 descendants and Page2) All Others. When 3 or more participants match, a group cluster is created and numbered. We have 45 total group clusters with 28 on Results Page1 and 17 on Results Page2. The largest cluster is Page2 Group4. The size of the group mostly reflects the enthusiam of the group members to study their DNA and recruit additional participants.

Jeff
8 Sep 2016 News from Mike Wright for Kelvedon Wrights:

I wanted to provide some information for R1b1 Results, Group 27 that you might do us a favor of adding to the next Project Progress Report so we can begin to advertise to what English origins that group is related.
This is a Kelvedon Hall Wright group despite the R1b1 haploid versus all the other Kelvedon Hall Wright descendants being haploid E1b1b1a2.

There was a NPE in the progenitor line of John Wright The Elder (1510 - 1563) in the period between 1552 and 1563. A child from outside the family was adopted as the eldest son of John Wright the Elder (d. 1563) who inherited Kelvedon Hall estate as a minor upon the death of his "adoptive father" in 1563. This "adopted" line then continued for an additional 8 successive John Wrights who all lived to inherit Kelvedon Hall and produce male offspring, including John Wright 1763-1824, whose second son by wife Elizabeth Lawson, William Wright, was granted title by Letters Patent in 1841 to the peerage of his mother's uncle, the 6th Baronet of Brough Hall, Yorkshire, England under the proviso that he adopt the surname Lawson. Elizabeth's uncle, Sir Henry Lawson, 6th Baronet of Brough Hall, had died in 1826 without living issue and the estate of Brough Hall passed to Elizabeth, but of course, not the peerage title. Elizabeth worked for nearly 15 years to persuade the Crown to continue the peerage in a second creation vested in her second son, William Wright, because her first born son, John Wright, had already inherited Kelvedon Hall. It was not until Queen Victoria ascended the throne in 1837 that Elizabeth's petitions for a second creation of the Baronetcy of Brough Hall found a favorable forum and was granted.

Our first participant listed in the DNA results is a thoroughly "peerage documented" direct male descendant of William (nee Wright) Lawson, 1st Baronet of Brough Hall, Second Creation and a brother of the present Baronet. There is no doubt he is both a descendant of the NPE heir of John Wright the Elder of Kelvedon Hall and of his direct male descendant, William Wright, who assumed the Yorkshire peerage of Brough Hall and surname of Lawson.

The remaining three participants with 111 marker matches to our William (nee Wright) Lawson descendant are all surnamed Wright. The first matching Robert Wright appears to have descended from a John Wright who came with James Oglethorpe in 1733 and helped found the town of Savannah, GA. The ancestor of the other two Robert Wrights appears to have arrived in Maryland prior to 1700 and ended up in Virginia. These two immigrant fathers are being further investigated both here in the States as well as in England to determine exactly how and by whom this third line of descent from John Wright (d 1551) came to immigrate to America.

That there are surname Wright exact Y-DNA matches to the existing Kelvedon Hall derived Lawson peerage that we can show arrived in America prior to the date of the second creation of the Baronetcy of Brough Hall was a critical finding and proof in preserving the integrity of the male lineage of the present peerage. Showing that the NPE happened in the male line well before the second creation of the Baronetcy was huge. It not only proved the integrity of the peerage lineage but greatly narrowed our time-line search focus for identifying the immigrant fathers of the two lines from this senior line of the Kelvedon Hall Wrights that we have found in America. So far as I know this is the first time that anyone has been able to identify male descendants of John Wright the Elder (d. 1563) as immigrants to America. His heir, John Wright (d. 1608) was not a natural born Wright and probably was adopted as an infant and was probably about 2 years old when his adoptive father died in 1563. He did not marry Audry Lawrence until 1579. His mother and guardian, Joan (nee Harris) Wright, died 4 years later in 1584. NPE John Wright and Audry Lawrence had five sons and two daughters. His eldest son, John Wright (1580 - 1661) married Anne Sulyard, a dau. of Sir Edward Suliard of Flemings, and by her he had 3 sons and 4 daughters. Anne died in 1617. (Kelvedon Hatch church, North wall chancel plaque & brass plate inscription, choir area).

I figure the more we advertise this new family group, the better the chance we will attract more participants to help us trace the US and English sides of the equation. This R1b1 haplogroup descending from John Wright the Elder may turn out to be as large a group of American descendants as we have for his younger brothers, Robert Wright (1516-1587) and Myddle John Wright (1522-1558) over in the E1b1b1a2 haplogroup! At the rate we are discovering new things about the Kelvedon Hatch Wrights, I may never finish writing my book about them!



Thanks and Best Regards,

Mike Wright

Kelvedon Diagram
13 Feb 2016 Participant Count:

Currently we have 527 Y-DNA participants in our result tables. These are divided into two pages: Page1) R1b1 descendants and Page2) All Others. When 3 or more participants match, a group cluster is created and numbered. We have 45 total group clusters with 28 on Results Page1 and 17 on Results Page2. The largest cluster is Page2 Group4. The size of the group mostly reflects the enthusiam of the group members to study their DNA and recruit additional participants.

Jeff
8 Jul 2015 Ancestor Naming Style:

While not so common now, John and William were very common names in the past. It makes keeping track of all the John and William Wrights a difficult task. I have adopted the practice of listing the year of death, the name, and if needed the last known location. Death dates are generally more available than birth dates. For example, John Wright who died in 1752 in York County VA would be listed as 1752 John of York VA. Some people use birthdates as identifiers, so it is important to know which method is being used when communicating with other researchers.

Jeff
24 May 2015 Project Summary 2015
11 May 2013 Matches with other surnames.

All of us are related if you go back far enough. Page 2 Group 4 seems to have it origins in Romans that moved to England - probably those that invaded about 100 AD. But, surnames were not adopted in England until 1066 after the Norman invasion. The surname chosen by a family often reflected an occupation or living location; we have identified over 100 lines of Wright, which is an occupation of worker - generally in wood.

Second, there is what is called mis-attributed paternity. This happens in the case of orphans, adopted children, unmarried moms, extramarital affairs, rape, etc. It is estimated that about 4% of births are to a man who is not the husband of a woman. That means there might be biologic relatedness from the genes passed, but the child may be raised with the surname of mom's husband, and history to his father's line may be unknown.

I generally recommend that people don't waste their time trying to find a common ancestor to someone with a different surname. We do have some participants in our project who know about their mis-attributed paternity and used the testing to verify it. And if there is a perfect 67/67 or 111/111 marker match, then that makes me look more closely. Instead, I suggest using the DNA test to help focus research. Find a third our fourth cousin with the same last name and encourage him to test. See how far back you can find common ancestors and then find descendants to test the various lines. Then you can focus research on that area and time period to learn more about your ancestors.

Jeff
6 Sep 2012 Example of TMRCA Calculation
14 May 2010 Exploring R1b Wrights
13 Jun 2008 Why is there a "W" at the start of our surname?

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
Wright
NOUN: One that constructs or repairs something. Often used in combination: a playwright; a shipwright.
ETYMOLOGY: Middle English, from Old English wryhta. See werg- in Appendix I.
wright (____), n.1 Forms: _.
1 wyrhta, Northumb. wyrihta, -te, wyrchta, 1_2 Kent. werhta;
2 wirhta,
3 wurhte, wuruhte. _. 1 wryhta, 3 wruhte, wrihhte, 3_4 wriht(e, 5 wrihte, 3_5 wryhte, wryht, (3, 5 wryth, 5 wrythe), 4 wry_t(e, 4_5 wri_t, 4_6 wrighte (4 whright, wrigth, writh), 5_6 wryght(e, 4_ wright; 2 wrichte, 5_6 Sc. wrycht (6 vrycht), 5_7, 9 Sc. wricht (5, 9 vricht, 9 wiricht);
4 wreght, 5 Sc. wrecht, 6 Sc. wreicht, 7 wreight, 9 dial. wreeght. _. 5 wryte, north. write, 9 north. dial. wreet (whreet), reet. [OE. wyrhta, wryhta, etc. (also _ewyrhta), = OFris. wrichta, OS. wurhtio, -eo, OHG. wurhto (MHG. (in combs.) wurhte, würhte, worhte), f. wurh-:---OTeut. *wur_-, variant stem of *wurk-: see work v.]
1. An artificer or handicraftsman; esp. a constructive workman. Now arch. or dial.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
ENTRY: werg-
DEFINITION: To do. Oldest form *wer-, becoming *werg- in centum languages.
Derivatives include work, allergy, surgery, wrought, and orgy.
I. Suffixed form *werg-o-. 1a. work; handiwork, from Old English weorc, werc, work; b. boulevard, bulwark, from Old High German werc, work. Both a and b from Germanic *werkam, work.
2. erg, ergative, –urgy; adrenergic, allergy, argon, cholinergic, demiurge, dramaturge, endergonic, endoergic, energy, ergograph, ergometer, ergonomics, exergonic, exergue, exoergic, georgic, hypergolic, lethargy, liturgy, metallurgy, surgery, synergid, synergism, thaumaturge, from Greek ergon, work, action.
II. Zero-grade form *wg-.
1. Suffixed forms *wg-yo-, *wg-to-. a. wrought, from Old English wyrcan, to work; b. irk, from Old Norse yrkja, to work. Both a and b from Germanic *wurkjan, to work, participle *wurhta-.
2. Suffixed form *wg-t-. wright, from Old English wryhta, maker, wright, from Germanic *wurhtj-.
III. O-grade form *worg-.
a. organ, organon, from Greek organon (with suffix -ano-), tool; b. orgy, from Greek orgia, secret rites, worship (< “service”). (Pokorny 2. er- 1168.)